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BCRF Grantee Since

2007

Area(s) of Focus

Antonio C. Wolff , MD

Professor of Oncology
Breast Cancer Program
Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center
Johns Hopkins University
Baltimore, Maryland

Current Research

On Behalf of the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium (TBCRC)

The Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium (www.tbcrc.org) united the efforts of many leading breast cancer programs from top academic medical centers throughout the United States. The Consortium, led by laboratory scientists and clinical researchers, pursues focused clinical trials that integrate clinical and laboratory studies in an effort to accelerate progress in breast cancer clinical research. Since its inception in late 2005, 28 clinical trials have been approved, 19 of which have been completed/closed to accrual.

Results from the first nine completed TBCRC trials -- two in triple negative breast cancer, two in HER2 positive disease, two in hormone receptor (HR) negative breast cancer (one of which was HR negative/ androgen receptor positive), one in HER2 negative breast cancer, one that examined optimal ways to use blood tests to follow patients receiving treatment for advanced breast cancer, and one that examined the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to help identify patients most likely to respond to systemic therapies before surgery -- have been presented at national meetings. Three of them have since been published in peer-reviewed journals, like the Journal of Clinical Oncology (TBCRC 001 Carey and 006 Chang) and Cancer (TBCRC 017 De Los Santos). Results from four other recently completed studies (two in triple negative breast cancer, one in endocrine resistant women, and one that assessed the prognostic impact of a biomarker in patients presenting with stage IV breast cancer) were presented at the June 2013 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting.

The TBCRC trials have provided critical insight in the quest to develop more effective and individualized therapies for the various subtypes of breast cancer.

Male Breast Cancer Study

Due to the rarity of the male breast cancer, international cooperation is necessary to undertake relevant projects with potential clinical impact. With BCRF support, the Male Breast Cancer International Registration and Biologic Characterization Program has been launched, as a joint effort between the Breast International Group (BIG) and the North American Breast Cancer Groups (NABCG) and coordinated by the European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC). In the first part of this program, clinical data and tumor samples from male BC cases treated in the last 20 years are being collected. Patients are accruing rapidly, with about 1600 patients registered, which makes this study the largest series of male breast cancer cases ever investigated. The pathology analysis of these tumor samples in the central labs has begun and will lead to a better understanding of the biological characteristics of this disease and to the identification of important potential prognostic (indicative of the good or bad outcome of the disease) and predictive (indicative of probability of response to certain therapies) markers. In 2013-2014, this international team plans to launch the second part of this program, a prospective registry, and will continue negotiations for the third part, a prospective clinical trial.

Mid-Year Summary

On Behalf of the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium (TBCRC)

In mid-January 2014, Dr. Wolff reported on behalf of the TBCRC that 29 clinical trials have been approved since the Consortium’s inception in 2005, 18 of which have been completed/closed to accrual. Four TBCRC subcommittees or working groups have been organized around various breast cancer phenotypes, as follows: the Triple Negative Working Group, the HER2 Resistance Working Group, the Endocrine Resistance Working Group, and the Loco-regional Disease Working Group.

Male Breast Cancer Study

The accrual closed early September 2013 and 1,800 patients have been registered. This is the largest series of male breast cancer ever studied. The pathology analysis of these tumor samples in the central labs is ongoing and will lead to a better understanding of the biological characteristics of this disease and to the identification of important potential prognostic (indicative of the good or bad outcome of the disease) and predictive (indicative of probability of response to certain therapies) markers. A 1st presentation of these data is expected during the 9th European Breast Cancer Conference, in Glasgow, Scotland, in March 2014. The second part of this program, a prospective registry, has just been launched (first patients are expected in February 2014) and negotiations are ongoing for the third part, a prospective clinical trial.

Bio

Dr. Wolff received his medical degree from the Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (Brazil, 1986). He completed an Internal Medicine residency at the Mount Sinai Medical Center (New York, 1991) and Medical Oncology fellowship at Johns Hopkins (Baltimore, 1995). He is a Professor of Oncology and member of the Breast Cancer Research Program at the Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center. His research interests include new treatment strategies and the development of prognostic and predictive biomarkers (tissue, blood, and imaging).

Dr. Wolff is a member of the Breast Cancer Committee of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) and the Breast Cancer Guidelines Committee of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN). He is past Chair of the Health Services Committee of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), which is the committee that oversees ASCO's efforts in the development, dissemination, and implementation of practice guidelines. He is also a member of ASCO's new Quality Care Committee, and is also interested in survivorship, needs assessments, and educational needs of breast cancer patients

Dr. Wolff is the Executive Officer for the Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium. He maintains an active clinical practice at Johns Hopkins dedicated to the care of patients with breast cancer. In 2009, he received a Cancer Clinical Investigator Team Leadership Award from the National Cancer Institute.

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